Raesin Cane

Straight from the Source – 2018 Conference Speaker, Raesin Caine

T-minus two weeks until #MNAC2018 and we could not be MORE excited about all the insightful, informative sessions this year! Milestones is especially thrilled about the outstanding line-up of self-advocates presenting, one being Raesin Caine, MS. Raesin is a self-proclaimed nerd for science, the arts, and learning new things whenever she can. Diagnosed just last year with autism, Raesin celebrated when she received the news. Since her diagnosis, Raesin has made it a personal goal to change the way people think about autism by counteracting negative perspectives of the disorder when she encounters them.

“If I had my way, I’d do away with the charity walks, puzzle pieces, and tragic language, and insist on reframing autism in a way that promotes confidence, ownership, and celebration (I’m imagining the enthusiasm you’d find at a drag ball or marching band extravaganza.)”

What initially got you interested in the Milestones Conference? Can you describe your first conference experience and why you wanted to come back as a speaker?

“Admittedly, I was starstruck by Temple Grandin, who has been one of my heroes since I first read about her back in the nineties in the book, An Anthroplogist on Mars. I was also curious about what I could learn at an autism conference since I’d never attended one before.

I had a lot to say on my feedback form for last year’s conference. I learned important things at some of the workshops, met great people, and absolutely loved Dr. Grandin’s talk. At the same time, I felt disappointed by the number of sessions offered by self-advocates. It’s important for self-advocates to see ourselves throughout the programming and for neurotypical people to listen to our perspectives, so that’s why I decided to submit a presentation proposal.

I spoke up in a couple of workshops during the question-and-answer sessions last year and a number of people pulled me aside to ask me more about my experience. Their reactions were a good reminder that parents, sponsors, and other attendees need to hear from self-advocates especially because we tend to be heavily outnumbered at autism conferences. I am certain autism conferences would proceed quite differently if self-advocates developed the full conference schedule, gave all the talks, and provided all the sponsorship.”
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